Ethics, Æsthetics, Ecology, Education

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OICR IS PROUD TO JOIN THE YOUTH CLIMATE LEADERS OF PDX IN SUPPORTING THE GLOBAL CLIMATE STRIKE  WITH THE PORTLAND RALLY COMMENCING AT PORTLAND CITY HALL
Sep
20
10:30 AM10:30

OICR IS PROUD TO JOIN THE YOUTH CLIMATE LEADERS OF PDX IN SUPPORTING THE GLOBAL CLIMATE STRIKE WITH THE PORTLAND RALLY COMMENCING AT PORTLAND CITY HALL

THE OREGON INSTITUTE FOR CREATIVE RESEARCH IS PROUD TO JOIN THE YOUTH CLIMATE LEADERS OF PDX, OUR FRIENDS AROUND THE GLOBE, AND FELLOW INHABITANTS OF EARTH, OF EVERY AGE AND FROM ALL WALKS OF LIFE, IN SUPPORTING THE GLOBAL CLIMATE STRIKE TOMORROW, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2019, WITH THE PORTLAND RALLY COMMENCING AT PORTLAND CITY HALL, 10:30 A.M.

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THIS IS NOT A RUSSIAN PLOT:  A "Readings for Now" Seminar
Sep
12
7:00 PM19:00

THIS IS NOT A RUSSIAN PLOT: A "Readings for Now" Seminar

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READINGS FOR EVENT

Devra Davis, “The Miseducation of America on 5G: The New York Times Gets It Spectacularly Wrong,” Medium, July 22, 2019

https://medium.com/swlh/ten-corrections-to-william-j-78094d3c1aee

Americans for Responsible Technology

https://www.americansforresponsibletech.org/issues

We are Americans who believe in the implementation of safe, reliable and responsible technology. We believe in the democratic process, and in our right to determine how new technologies will be integrated into our neighborhoods, our homes and our lives.  We believe the issues that surround the widespread deployment of new wireless 4G/5G technologies must be addressed before taxpayer money is used to expand them.  No vague promise of future benefits is worth jeopardizing our democratic principles, our freedom of choice, or our health, safety, security and privacy.

Feinstein, Blumenthal Demand Answers on FCC Role in Frivolous 5G ...

https://www.feinstein.senate.gov/public/index.cfm/press-releases?ID=6D69E7FF-C301-4051-9274-C1BDFE377BCF Jan 30, 2019 -Washington—Senate Judiciary Committee Ranking Member Dianne Feinstein (D -Calif.) and Senator Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.) ...

Physicians for Safe Technology

https://mdsafetech.org/problems/5g/

Paul Héroux, “5G and IoT: A Trojan Horse,” La Maison du 21e siècle, February 11, 2018

https://maisonsaine.ca/english/5g-and-iot-a-trojan-horse.html

International Society of Doctors for Environment 

“5G networks in European Countries appeal for a standstill in respect of the precautionary principle”

http://www.isde.org/5G_appeal.pdf

Martin L. Pall, “Electromagnetic fields act via activation of voltage‐gated calcium channels to produce beneficial or adverse effects,” Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Volume 17, Issue 8, August 2013, pages 958-965

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/jcmm.12088

The Internet of Things Poses Human Health Risks. Scientists Question the Safety of Untested 5G Technology at International Conference

https://ehtrust.org/key-issues/cell-phoneswireless/5g-internet-everything/20-quick-facts-what-you-need-to-know-about-5g-wireless-and-small-cells/

Sue Halpern, “The Terrifying Potential of the 5G Network,” The New Yorker, April 26, 2019

The future of wireless technology holds the promise of total connectivity. But it will also be especially susceptible to cyberattacks and surveillance.

https://www.newyorker.com/news/annals-of-communications/the-terrifying-potential-of-the-5g-network

Gandhi, O.p., and A. Riazi. “Absorption of Millimeter Waves by Human Beings and Its Biological Implications.”

IEEE Transactions on Microwave Theory and Techniques, vol. 34, no. 2, 1986, pp. 228–235., doi:10.1109/tmtt.1986.1133316. [online] Available at: 
https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/document/1133316/authors#authors [Accessed 5 Jun. 2019].

With recent advances in millimeter-wave technology, including the availability of high-power sources in this band, it has become necessary to understand the biological implications of this energy for human beings. This paper gives the millimeter-wave absorption efficiency for the human body with and without clothing. Ninety to ninety-five percent of the incident energy may be absorbed in the skin with dry clothing, with or without an intervening air gap, acting as an impedance transformer. On account of the submillimeter depths of penetration in the skin, superficial SAR'S as high as 65-357 W/Kg have been calculated for power density of incident radiation corresponding to the ANSI guideline of 5 mW/cm/sup 2/. Because most of the millimeter-wave absorption is in the region of the cutaneous thermal receptors (0.1 - 1.0 mm), the sensations of absorbed energy are likely to be similar to those of IR. For the latter, threshold of heat perception is near 0.67 mW/cm/sup 2/, with power densities on the order of 8.7 mW/cm/sup 2/ likely to cause sensations of "very warm to hot" with a latency of 1.0+-0.6s. Calculations are made for thresholds of hearing of pulsed millimeter waves. Pulsed energy densities of 143-579 µJ/cm/sup 2/ are obtained for the frequency band 30-300 GHz. These are 8-28 times larger than the threshold for microwaves below 3 GHz. The paper also points to the need for evaluation of ocular effects of millimeter-wave irradiation because of high SAR's in the cornea.

Joel Moskowitz, University of California, Berkeley, "Cell Phones, Cell Towers, and Wireless Safety"

https://youtu.be/zE-ff6oSY0k

Joel Moskowitz is a Research Faculty Member at the University of California, Berkeley, in the School of Public Health. His talk "Cell Phones, Cell Towers, and Wireless Safety" was presented as part of the "Balancing Technology" Series at the University Health Services, UC Berkeley on February 27, 2019

Nasim, I. and Kim, S. (2019). Human Exposure to RF Fields in 5G Downlink

Available at: https://arxiv.org/abs/1711.03683 

[Accessed 5 Jun. 2019].

While cellular communications in millimeter wave (mmW) bands have been attracting significant research interest, their potential harmful impacts on human health are not as significantly studied. Prior research on human exposure to radio frequency (RF) fields in a cellular communications system has been focused on uplink only due to the closer physical contact of a transmitter to a human body. However, this paper claims the necessity of thorough investigation on human exposure to downlink RF fields, as cellular systems deployed in mmW bands will entail (i) deployment of more transmitters due to smaller cell size and (ii) higher concentration of RF energy using a highly directional antenna. In this paper, we present human RF exposure levels in downlink of a Fifth Generation Wireless Systems (5G). Our results show that 5G downlink RF fields generate significantly higher power density (PD) and specific absorption rate (SAR) than a current cellular system. This paper also shows that SAR should also be taken into account for determining human RF exposure in the mmW downlink.

Verizon CEO Vestberg [sic] Takes 5G Hype to 11 at CES – Multichannel

https://www.multichannel.com/blog/verizon-ceo-vestberg-takes-5g-hype-to-11-at-ces

Jan 9, 2019 - ... Hans Vesterberg stressed during his jam- -packed CES keynote at the ... was New York Times CEO Mark Thompson, who presented how 5G ...

Preview YouTube video US Senator Blumenthal Raises Concerns on 5G Wireless Technology Health Risks at Senate Hearing 

https://ehtrust.org/5g-and-its-small-cell-towers-threaten-public-health-harvard-phd-scientist/

“Mill Valley Joins Effort to Constrain 5-G Proliferation”

By ADRIAN RODRIGUEZ | arodriguez@marinij.com | Marin Independent Journal

PUBLISHED: September 9, 2018 at 4:09 pm | UPDATED: September 9, 2018 at 5:44 pm

The city of Mill Valley has enacted an urgency ordinance to regulate “small cell” towers amid concerns that cellphone companies want to grow their 5G networks and install new equipment in Marin.

https://www.marinij.com/2018/09/09/mill-valley-joins-effort-to-constrain-5g-proliferation/ - comments

“Head of NOAA says 5G deployment could set weather forecasts back ...,Head of NOAA says 5G deployment could set weather forecasts back 40 years. The wireless industry denies it,” Washington Post, May 23, 2019

https://www.washingtonpost.com/weather/2019/05/23/head-noaa-says-g-deployment-could-set-weather-forecasts-back-years-wireless-industry-denies-it/

May 23, 2019 - Last week, Neil Jacobs, the acting head of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, told Congress that 5G interference could set the accuracy of weather forecastsback 40 years. ... (The study, a collaborative effort between NOAA, NASA and the FCC, still under deliberation, is not public.

What is 5G?

https://whatis5g.info

Proximity to a cell tower typically lowers property values by more than 20%.

See https://ehtrust.org/cell-phone-towers-lower-property-values-documentation-research/  A cell tower could easily take hundreds of thousands- if not millions- in value away from local real estate.

Susan Crawford (John A. Reilly Clinical Professor of Law, Harvard Law School), “Why 5G Makes Me Reconsider the Health Effects of Cellphones,” Wired, April 1, 2019 (ORIGINAL VERSION OF ARTICLE)

The FCC's safety standards for cellular communications date from 1996. 5G networks will require many more cell sites, operating at higher frequencies.

https://web.archive.org/web/20190401150103/https://www.wired.com/story/why-5g-makes-reconsider-health-effects-cellphones/

Susan Crawford, “5G and the Health Effects of Cell Phones,” Wired, April 1, 2019 (EDITED VERSION OF ARTICLE)

Editor's note: An earlier version of this story relied on some source materials that did not meet WIRED’s standards for scientific rigor. The piece has now been modified to cite more reputable sourcing and reflect their findings. You can read an archived version of the article here.

https://www.wired.com/story/why-5g-makes-reconsider-health-effects-cellphones/

See also YaleGlobal Online: https://yaleglobal.yale.edu/content/unknowns-5g-health-effects-wired

Martin L. Pall, “5G: Great risk for EU, U.S. and International Health! Compelling Evidence for Eight Distinct Types of Great Harm Caused by Electromagnetic Field (EMF) Exposures and the Mechanism that Causes Them”

https://peaceinspace.blogs.com/files/5g-emf-hazards--dr-martin-l.-pall--eu-emf2018-6-11us3.pdf

Devra Davis, “Cell Phone Radiation: Is It Dangerous?” Huffington PostTHE BLOG,03/01/2011 07:20 am ET (updated May 25, 2011)

https://www.huffpost.com/entry/cell-phone-radiation-_b_828330

Tom Banse, “Pushback against superfast 5G wireless spreads to at least 7 Pacific Northwest cities,” May 31, 2019

https://www.klcc.org/post/pushback-against-superfast-5g-wireless-spreads-least-7-pacific-northwest-cities

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Brian Liu to present paper at Progressive Connexions' Vienna Conference on Friendship
Sep
1
4:00 PM16:00

Brian Liu to present paper at Progressive Connexions' Vienna Conference on Friendship

Brian Liu presents “Because We Are Friends; Or, the Conspiracy of Friendship”

Medieval historian and critic Ivan Illich proposed a search for a new askesis, a set of practices that make virtuous action possible. Friendship is, for Illich, that new askesis, the only properly human response to radical dehumanization, the reduction of people into components of the several key systems he identified and analyzed over the course of some twenty years: economic systems, transportation systems, pedagogical systems, medical systems.  Friendship is a relationship built on faith, humility, and poverty of spirit.  It is the very basis of hospitality, impelling/inviting one to say “no, thank you” to the ruling assumptions of scarcity, progress, and competition that systems catalyze and on which they rely.  “Learned and leisurely hospitality is the only antidote to the stance of deadly cleverness that is acquired in the professional pursuit of objectively secured knowledge,” notes Illich in “The Cultivation of Conspiracy” (1998).  “I remain certain that the quest for truth cannot thrive outside the nourishment of mutual trust flowering into a commitment to friendship.”  Here, twenty years down the line, in an act of homage if not pilgrimage, I return to the meditations on otherness, powerlessness, and love of “the prophet of Cuernavaca,” the means by which he believed an art of living could be established and fostered.  With the help of a wide range of diverse interlocutors, including Hannah Arendt, Emmanuel Levinas, Giorgio Agamben, Wendell Berry, and Srecko Horvat, among others, I rethink, and think through, the possibility of the sovereignty of friendship today, the relationship that exists solely in itself and for itself, and, as such, categorically refuses assimilation into, and cooptation by, any system. 

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Oregon Institute for Creative Research holds roundtable with Our Children's Trust’s Jacob Lebel at the 600-acre, biodynamic Broken Branch Farm
Aug
10
to Aug 11

Oregon Institute for Creative Research holds roundtable with Our Children's Trust’s Jacob Lebel at the 600-acre, biodynamic Broken Branch Farm

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Members and guests of the Oregon Institute for Creative Research hold roundtable on the unedited, advance version of the UN-backed “Summary for policymakers of the global assessment report on biodiversity and ecosystem services” with Our Children's Trust’s Jacob Lebel at the 600-acre, biodynamic Broken Branch Farm in southern Oregon, Saturday, August 10. Featuring Special Guest Regina Scharf, Environmental Journalist and Former Member of the United Nations Environmental Program Finance Initiative


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Jul
15
to Jul 29

Maria Fernanda Nunez receives 2019 Bex Frankel Award at Vermont Studio Center

Maria Fernanda Nuñez is a Colombian-born artist based in Portland, Oregon.  After spending her formative years in Bogotá, where she studied photography at the Zone Five School of Film and Photography, she relocated to the United States in 2011 to pursue a BFA in Sculpture at the California College of the Arts, which she completed in 2015.  Upon graduation, she worked as a furniture apprentice in Houston, Texas, where she also participated in a home-building project, and, later, attended the Penland School of Crafts, where she studied blacksmithing and metalwork.  In 2016, she was a Resident Intern at the Headlands Center for the Arts and the following year was awarded a Windgate Craft Fellowship at the Vermont Studio Center, for which she served as a juror in 2018.  During her time in Portland, she has shown and performed work at the ADX Annex Gallery and Screaming Sky Gallery and is currently completing a Graduate Certificate in Critical Theory and Creative Research at the Oregon Institute for Creative Research, where she also works as a design and research assistant.  Although her interests are multifarious and interdisciplinary, much of her work is sculpture-based, utilizing a wide range of materials and focusing on themes of hybridity and liminality.  Her latest body of work, “Fragments of the Incorruptible Corpse,” draws upon a collection of nonfiction writing and drawings as well as video and installation components.

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Susan Cohen presents “The U.S. Immigration Landscape in the Trump Era”
Jun
28
12:30 PM12:30

Susan Cohen presents “The U.S. Immigration Landscape in the Trump Era”

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Susan Cohen is Founding Chair of Immigration Practice at the Boston firm Mintz, Levin, Cohn, Ferris, Glovsky and Popeo, where she oversees the work of 12 attorneys and 18 immigration specialists, and President of the Board of the Political Asylum/Immigration Representation Project, which since 1989, provides free legal services to asylum seekers and promotes the rights of detained immigrants.  She has chaired and co-chaired a wide range of committees of the American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA), including the National Planning Committee for AILA’s Annual Immigration Law Conference.  She has served as a member of the review board for AILA periodicals as well as the American Bar Association’s liaison to the Department of Labor on immigration-related issues.  She is a frequent panelist at AILA, ABA, and other immigration-related conferences, and a contributor to numerous immigration-related publications.  Among her many accomplishments are contributions to the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) regulations implementing the Immigration Act of 1990, the Department of Labor regulations implementing changes to the H-1B visa category as a result of the American Competitiveness and Workforce Improvement Act of 1998, the Department of Labor PERM labor certification regulations issued in 2004, the drafting of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts legislation that resulted in the Massachusetts Global Entrepreneur in Residence (GEIR) program in 2014, and the temporary restraining order on the 2017 Travel Ban obtained by the ACLU of Massachusetts and other organizations.  She is the recipient of numerous awards for her political asylum work, including awards from the Supreme Judicial Court of Massachusetts, the Political Asylum/Immigration Representation (PAIR) Project, and the Massachusetts Lawyers Weekly.  She writes for and appears frequently in the media, from Bloomberg to the PBS NewHour to the Washington Post.  In addition to her legal work, she is also a songwriter and the founder of White Dove Projects.  Two of her songs have been performed by students and alumni of the Berklee College of Music in BostonBeyond the Borders,” which concerns the plight of a Syrian refugee family, and “Looking for the Angels,” her second music video about an Honduran teenager bidding farewell to his grandmother, as he leaves to escape the brutal violence in their country."  Many students who participated were from countries affected by the travel ban, including lead singer Nano Raies, the first Syrian woman to study at Berklee.  

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Michael W. Klein presents “An Alternative to Alternative Facts”
Jun
28
12:00 PM12:00

Michael W. Klein presents “An Alternative to Alternative Facts”

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Michael W. Klein is William L. Clayton Professor of International Economic Affairs at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University.  His research and teaching focus on international macroeconomics.  Trained at Brandeis and Columbia Universities, he is the author of three books and over two dozen articles on a range of topics, including exchange rate policy, international capital flows, the impact of trade on the U.S. labor market, and the determinants of foreign direct investment.  From 2010-2011, he served as the chief economist in the Office of International Affairs of the United States Department of the Treasury.  He is a Research Associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research and the Founder, Research Director, and Co-executive Editor of EconoFact, a website that provides economic analysis on timely policy issues (econofact.org).  He has been a Visiting Scholar at the International Monetary Fund, the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve, the Bank of England, and the Federal Reserve Banks of Boston, New York, San Francisco, and Dallas.  

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Romeo Oriogun reads his own poems and selections from the work of other Nigerian poets
Jun
14
12:30 PM12:30

Romeo Oriogun reads his own poems and selections from the work of other Nigerian poets

Nigerian poet Romeo Oriogun is the winner of the 2017 Brunel International African Poetry Prize, with the judges calling him “an urgent new voice in African poetry.”  Author of the chapbooks Burnt Men (Praxis) and The Origin of Butterflies (APBF and Akashic Books), he was shortlisted for the Sillerman First Book Prize for African Poets in 2017 for his manuscript My Body Is No Miracle.  His poems have appeared in the literary magazine Prairie Schooner as well as on-line at the Dissident Blog, Connotation Press, and Brittle Paper, among others.  He is the Spring 2019 Scholars-at-Risk Fellow at Harvard University, an Artist Protection Fund Fellow at the Institute of International Education (IIE), and a W.E.B. DuBois Research Institute Fellow, Hutchins Center for African & African American Research, Harvard University.  He joins the Oregon Institute for Creative Research as its Summer 2019 Visiting Artist.

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Sigrid Hackenberg y Almansa presents “Dreaming Language, the Unknown”
Jun
14
12:30 PM12:30

Sigrid Hackenberg y Almansa presents “Dreaming Language, the Unknown”

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Sigrid Hackenberg y Almansa (b. 1960, Barcelona, Spain) is an interdisciplinary artist, writer, and philosopher based in New York.  Her new media works have been exhibited internationally, and her writing, influenced by both Continental philosophy and feminism, addresses questions of language and the feminine, the act of reading and writing, and “ethics as first philosophy.”  She is the author of a study on G. W. F. Hegel and Emmanuel Levinas, Total History, Anti-History, and the Face That Is Other (Atropos Press), and co-editor, with Lenart Škof, of Bodily Proximity (Ljubljana: Nova revija).  Her critical essays have appeared in Breathing with Luce Irigaray, edited by L. Škof & E. Holmes (Bloomsbury Press), and in a special issue on Julia Kristeva in the Cincinnati Romance Review 35, among other publications.  Her artwork has been featured at the Museo Laboratorio Di Arte Contemporanea, Universita degli Studi di Roma La Sapienza; Museum of Image and Sound, Sao Paolo; Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam; Aperto '93, and XLV Venice Biennale.  Hackenberg y Almansa grew up in Spain, Germany, Japan, Canada, and the United States.  She was awarded a B.A. from San Francisco State University, an M.A. from New York University, and a Ph.D. in Media and Communications from the European Graduate School (EGS), Switzerland.  She has taught Media Art, Installation, and Performative Practices at New York University (NYU) and Continental Philosophy, Critical Theory, and Aesthetics at the European Graduate School (EGS).  She has been a Distinguished Visiting Scholar at the Critical Theory and Creative Research Program (CT+CR), Portland, OR.  Currently, she is a Dissertation and Independent Study Director at the Institute for Doctoral Studies in the Visual Arts (IDSVA), Portland, Maine.

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Trace Fleeman y Garcia makes poster presentation at the International Urban Wildlife Conference at Portland State University
Jun
2
to Jun 5

Trace Fleeman y Garcia makes poster presentation at the International Urban Wildlife Conference at Portland State University

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Trace Fleeman y Garcia
Poster Presentation
Portland Urban Wildlife Conference

Much contemporary discourse informing attitudes towards wildlife is based on the single proposition that humans and nonhumans belong to, and belong in, different spaces, with a few acceptable interlopers in the form of domesticated animals, animals-as-property, interspecies families, and so forth.  The concept of “urban wildlife,” in and of itself, throws the status quo into question and represents a conceptual advance, for what has not yet been adequately theorized are new types of post-species arrangements and dynamics.  As an ecologist and eco-activist, I am interested especially in the possible vacuum that might arise with the demise of species-ism, considering such a possibility as both a challenge and an opportunity for rethinking the notion of species as well as imagining radically different relationships and arrangements between humans and other animals.  With this presentation, I seek to outline not a political program but various spaces for post-species possibilities, both sacred and profane.

See conference details here

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Romeo Oriogun named Summer 2019 OICR Visiting Artist
Jun
1
to Aug 4

Romeo Oriogun named Summer 2019 OICR Visiting Artist

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Nigerian poet Romeo Oriogun is the winner of the 2017 Brunel International African Poetry Prize, with the judges calling him “an urgent new voice in African poetry.” Author of the chapbooks Burnt Men (Praxis) and The Origin of Butterflies (APBF and Akashic Books), he was shortlisted for the Sillerman First Book Prize for African Poets in 2017 for his manuscript My Body Is No Miracle. His poems have also appeared in the literary magazine Prairie Schooner as well as on-line at the Dissident Blog, Connotation Press, and Brittle Paper, among others. He is the Spring 2019 Scholars-at-Risk Fellow at Harvard University, an Artist Protection Fund Fellow at the Institute of International Education (IIE), and a W.E.B. DuBois Research Institute Fellow, Hutchins Center for African & African American Research, Harvard University. He will join the OICR as a Visiting Artist in Summer 2019.

Read Elegy for a Burnt Friend here

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Sebastian Matthews presents "Hybridity"
Mar
29
12:30 PM12:30

Sebastian Matthews presents "Hybridity"

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Sebastian Matthews is the author of the memoir In My Father’s Footsteps (W.W. Norton & Co.) as well as two collections of poetry, We Generous and Miracle Day, both published by Red Hen Press.  A third collection, Beginner’s Guide to a Head-on Collision, was published by Red Hen in 2017.  His poetry and prose have appeared in American Poetry Review, The Atlantic, Blackbird, The Common, From the Fishouse, Georgia Review, Massachusetts Review, New England Review, Poets & Writers, storySouth, The Sun, Tin House, Virginia Quarterly Review, Writer’s Almanac, and Writer’s Chronicle, among others.  He earned an MFA in Fiction from the University of Michigan, and has taught in the Undergraduate Writing Program, Warren Wilson College; Great Smokies Writing Program, University of North Carolina, Asheville; and the Low-Residency MFA in Creative Writing, Queen’s University of Charlotte as well as serving as a Visiting Writer at a host of institutions, including Franklin and Marshall, Institute of American Indian Arts, Pitzer College, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga (Meacham Conference), UNC-Wilmington’s Writers Week, and the Vermont Studio Center, among others.  

He is the recipient of fellowships from the North Carolina Arts Council, Vermont Studio Center, and Asheville Area Arts Council, as well being awarded a Bernard DeVoto Fellowship in Nonfiction at the Bread Loaf Writers Conference.  Formerly the editor of Rivendell, a place-based literary journal, he now serves on the editorial board of Q Avenue Press, where he designs, edits, and produces collaborative chapbooks and letterpress broadsides.  In addition, he has served as poetry editor for Ecotone: Re-Imagining Place and as guest editor at the Asheville Poetry Review, working with editor Keith Flynn on its jazz issue.  His collages have been exhibited at Asheville Book Works and William King Museum’s Contemporary Regional Gallery and featured in Asheville Poetry Review, Café Review, and Iron Horse Review.  He curated the show From BMC to NYC: The Tutelary Years of Ray Johnson (1943-1967) for the Black Mountain College Museum + Arts Center as well as edited the exhibition catalogue.  He is a member of the Advisory Board for Callaloo: A Journal of African Diaspora Arts & Letters

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Trace Fleeman y Garcia presents his work at the 50th Anniversary Convention of the Northeast Modern Language Association
Mar
21
to Mar 24

Trace Fleeman y Garcia presents his work at the 50th Anniversary Convention of the Northeast Modern Language Association

image credit: http://www.buffalo.edu/nemla/convention.html

image credit: http://www.buffalo.edu/nemla/convention.html

Convention Theme: Transnational Spaces: Intersections of Cultures, Languages, and Peoples

Washington, D.C.

March 21-24, 2019

PANEL
11.7 Memory, Time, and the Aftermath: Visualizing Histories That Hurt in the Americas (Roundtable)

Chair:  Campbell Birch, Columbia University
Chair:  Daniella Wurst, Columbia University

Cultural Studies and Media Studies & Interdisciplinary Humanities

“Time, Photography, and the Interstitial Moment in Franz Krajnik’s Uchuraccay”
Daniella Wurst, Columbia University 

“Scar Tissue:  Indigeneous Identity, Colonialism, and Undecidability in Chicanx Visual Art”
Trace Fleeman y Garcia, Oregon Institute for Creative Research

“Layering Traumas:  Jewish Narratives of Holocaust and Dictatorship in the Southern Cone”
Charlotte Gartenberg, Graduate Center, CUNY

“Winesburg, Ohio (1919) and Sad Small Communities in American Films a Century Later”
Michael West, University of Pittsburgh

“Regarding the Pain of the Past:  Red Records, Racial Terror, Memory Museums”
Campbell Birch, Columbia University


“Scar Tissue:  Indigeneous Identity, Colonialism, and Undecidability in Chicanx Visual Art”
Trace Fleeman y Garcia, Oregon Institute for Creative Research

Abstract:  In 1962, Richard Chavez, brother of the better-known Chicano labor activist Cesar Chavez, designed the now famous logo of the National Farm Workers Association: an upturned Aztec pyramid in black, transformed into an eagle, the traditional symbol for Mexico since pre-Columbian times.  This was neither the first nor the last reference to a pre-colonial history during the Mexican-American Civil Rights Movement: From murals and flags to tattoos and decorative car hoods, a pervasive folk memory of a noble indigenous past persists as well as the ever-present scar tissue of 1492.  Intentional or not, the use of indigenous imagery in la causa elicits a clear narrative, that of a native people who, colonized by a foreign, outside power, now wield their own heritage as a weapon in la lucha, the fight—a view at odds with that of Anglo-Americans, which relegates the Chicanx to the outside margins of society as immigrants, an external threat to white hegemony.  From this perspective, the position of the Chicanx is undecidable and Chicanismx uniquely revolutionary at multiple levels.  The colonial structure is unable to classify Chicanxs according to its constituent oppositions, the wide variety of races in cohesive Latin-American communities completely disrupting racial biopolitics, while Folk Catholicism, with its traces of indigenous syncretism, complicates Christian-pagan schemas, and the presence of Spanish and Nahuatl names in ex-Mexican states betrays the archetype of the Mexican immigrant. Through a semiotic analysis of Chicanx visual culture, novel and self-consistent systems of thought can be uncovered, with their ultimate origin rooted in the folk memory of ancient civilizations and their downfall occurring at the hands of Western Europeans. Only apparently absent, these older structures continue to underpin, and determine, Latinx identity.  Pre-Columbian institutions survive, their material forms having been re-configured into new, and sometimes unpredictable, abstract and visual manifestations.



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OICR Cohort to attend the 8th Annual Animal Law Symposium, Lewis & Clark Law School
Mar
15
9:30 AM09:30

OICR Cohort to attend the 8th Annual Animal Law Symposium, Lewis & Clark Law School

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ALR’s 8th Annual Symposium

Date: March 15
Location: Law Campus

Animal Law Review invites you to join Lewis & Clark Law School’s 8th Annual Animal Law Review Symposium on Friday, March 15, 2019. Every year our Annual Animal Law Symposium has a theme that reflects the dynamic and groundbreaking nature of the animal law field. The theme for our symposium this year is Cycles of Violence: Examining the Relationship Between Human and Nonhuman Animal Oppression and Exploitation.

This year’s symposium will examine the intersectional nature of the oppression and exploitation of both human and nonhuman animals, and the ways in which these dualistic systems of oppression interact to exacerbate and perpetuate one another. Animal Law Review has arranged for a special group of experts in the field to speak at this year’s symposium. 

SPEAKERS & TOPICS:

Lauren Ornelas, Founder and Executive Director, Food Empowerment Project, “Food Justice: How Your Food Choices Can Change the World”

Maneesha Deckha, Professor of Law, University of Victoria, “Decolonization, Reconciliation, and Animal Agriculture”

Mathilde Cohen, Professor of Law, University of Connecticut School of Law,  “Toward an Interspecies Right to Breastfeed” (videoconference)

Margo DeMello, Program Director, Human Animal Studies, Animals & Society Institute, “Intersectionality in Human-Animal Studies”

Diane Balkin, Senior Staff Attorney, Criminal Justice Program, Animal Legal Defense Fund, “The Link Between Domestic Violence and Animal Cruelty”

Raj Reddy, Director, Animal Law LL.M. Program, Lewis & Clark Law School, “Coloring Outside the Lines: Reckoning with Race in the March for Animal Rights”

Jay Shooster, Of Counsel, Richman Law Group, “Why Human Rights Groups Are Beginning to Support Animal Rights, and Why Animal Rights Groups Should Support Human Rights”

Justin Marceau, Professor of Law, University of Denver Sturm College of Law, “Beyond Cages: Animal Law and Criminal Punishment”

Russ Mead, Shared Earth Foundation Visiting Professor, Lewis & Clark Law School, “Ethics and Moral Implications”

Read more about the event here

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OICR Faculty and Students to present position papers calling for a moratorium on the implementation and installation of 5G, Portland City Council
Mar
13
12:00 PM12:00

OICR Faculty and Students to present position papers calling for a moratorium on the implementation and installation of 5G, Portland City Council

image: http://www.seradesign.com/projects/portland-city-hall/

image: http://www.seradesign.com/projects/portland-city-hall/

OICR Faculty and Students will present position papers calling for a moratorium on the implementation and installation of 5G and a full-scale scientific investigation of the effects of increased radio frequency wireless emissions on humans, animals, and other life-forms, free from the influence of, and pressure by, the telecommunications industry

PORTLAND CITY COUNCIL
City Hall – 1221 SW Fourth Avenue

March 13, 2019

227. Request the federal government update studies on the potential health risks of 5G radio frequency wireless emissions and publish findings, as federal guidelines push for more rapid deployment of 5G  (Resolution introduced by Mayor Wheeler, Commissioners Eudaly and Fritz), 10 minutes requested.


See full council agenda here

Read resolution here

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Brazilian writer, journalist, and screenwriter Flávia Rocha presents "Wild Objects"
Feb
22
3:30 PM15:30

Brazilian writer, journalist, and screenwriter Flávia Rocha presents "Wild Objects"

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Brazilian writer, journalist, and screenwriter Flávia Rocha holds an M.F.A. in Writing/Poetry from Columbia University and for thirteen years was an editor for the New York-based multimedia literary magazine Rattapallax. She is the author of three books of poetry—A Casa Azul ao Meio-Dia (Travessa dos Editores, 2005), Quartos Habitáveis (Confraria do Vento, 2009) and Um País (Confraria do Vento, 2015), all published in Brazil—and her poems, essays, and translations have appeared in magazines across the U.S., U.K., Brazil, Australia, Italy, and Romania. She has worked as a reporter for the Brazilian magazines Casa Vogue, Carta Capital, República, and Bravo! and is a contributor to numerous other publications. A founder of Academia Internacional de Cinema, a film school with branches in São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro, she is co-writer of the feature film Birds of Neptune (2015), and is currently collaborating on the features Anatomy of the Sun and White Sky Night as well as the series The Stags.

“Wild Objects" is a conversation about the power of duende, feral poetry, surrealism, . . . when to let go and when to take control.

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Xac Denton receives the Spring 2019 OICR Fellowship in Critical Theory + Filmmaking
Feb
10
6:00 PM18:00

Xac Denton receives the Spring 2019 OICR Fellowship in Critical Theory + Filmmaking

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Xac Denton is interested in the intersection, and occasional collapse, of time and space, light and sound.  An award-winning creative producer hailing from Northwest Arkansas, he first studied Music Business at Belmont University in Nashville, Tennessee, before enrolling at John Brown University, Siloam Springs, Arkansas, where he graduated in 2009, with a B.S. in Digital Media Arts with an emphasis in Filmmaking.  He was named Best Director at the John Brown Annual Film Festival for Destiny and Chance, a film inspired by the life and work of Philip K. Dick, as well as Best Editor for the music video This Time I’m Leaving.  In 2007, he was a visiting artist in the Faculty of Fine Arts at Gazi University, Ankara, Turkey, where his work, sponsored by the Istanbul Foundation for Culture and Arts, was exhibited in the Saatchi Gallery.  He has worked as a video and motion-graphics producer, editor, and compositor on behalf of companies like Big-Giant, for which he created three of the video loops for Nike’s “Camp Victory” installation at the 2012 U.S. Olympic Trials in Eugene, Oregon.  His film work increasingly focuses on paradoxes of time, as exemplified in Philip K. Dick’s 1978 speech “How to Build a Universe That Doesn’t Fall apart Two Days Later.”

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Salah Badis presents "Non-fiction/Self-writing"
Nov
19
7:00 PM19:00

Salah Badis presents "Non-fiction/Self-writing"

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Algerian poet, journalist, and translator Salah Badis is a Fall 2018 Resident at the International Writing Program, University of Iowa, and the inaugural IWP@OICR Writer-in-Residence.  A freelance journalist since 2012, he is a musical and cultural researcher for both print and radio and a founding member of Nafha, one of the most important cultural magazines in Algeria.  His poems and essays in Arabic have been translated into French, English, and Turkish, with his first volume of poetry, ضجرالبواخر [The Boredom of Ships], published in 2016 by Al Mutawassit Press (Milan and Beirut).  In 2017, he worked in the Algerian radio archives with French curator Yasmina Reggad for the project We Dreamed of Utopia and We Woke up Screaming.  A writer for the Algerian news site Casbah Tribune, he has also served as Visiting Editor of the literary supplement Kalimat for the Lebanese newspaper Al-Akhbar.  He is currently working on the translation of two French novels to be published in 2018 by Barzakh Press.

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The event will take place at the Library at Literary Arts: 925 SW Washington Street, Portland, 97205.

 
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IWP@OICR Writer-in-Residence Salah Badis reads from his work at PSU
Nov
14
2:00 PM14:00

IWP@OICR Writer-in-Residence Salah Badis reads from his work at PSU

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Algerian poet, journalist, and translator Salah Badis is a Fall 2018 Resident at the International Writing Program, University of Iowa, and the inaugural IWP@OICR Writer-in-Residence.  A freelance journalist since 2012, he is a musical and cultural researcher for both print and radio and a founding member of Nafha, one of the most important cultural magazines in Algeria.  His poems and essays in Arabic have been translated into French, English, and Turkish, with his first volume of poetry, ضجرالبواخر [The Boredom of Ships], published in 2016 by Al Mutawassit Press (Milan and Beirut).  In 2017, he worked in the Algerian radio archives with French curator Yasmina Reggad for the project We Dreamed of Utopia and We Woke up Screaming.  A writer for the Algerian news site Casbah Tribune, he has also served as Visiting Editor of the literary supplement Kalimat for the Lebanese newspaper Al-Akhbar.  He is currently working on the translation of two French novels to be published in 2018 by Barzakh Press.

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